Extreme Close-up: UK Waterproof Omega Seamaster 300 Fake Watch

Why is this shot of mine here, where you can’t even see the dial? And why am I cheeky enough to include one of my own? Well, photo tip time … This perfect replica Omega Seamaster 300 watch was sharp, compact and proper delightful on the wrist, more so than I expected (OK, I loved it!). But the anti-reflective coating on the crystal made it a difficult beast to capture, so here are a few tips that made this possible.

  1. Buy a polarising filter for your camera. Placed in front of the camera lens this will help you to manage reflections or suppress glare and make watch photography a lot easier.
  2. A macro lens is absolutely vital to make the quality features of a watch come alive. They enable you to “feel” the textural details and highlight every surface and rivet. The Seamaster macro shot was in natural light with a micro four thirds 30mm 1:3,5 macro lens on a Lumix GX9.
  3. In terms of lighting, the best-case scenario is sunlight, but outside and in a corner with no direct sun rays (boy, can they mess up any shot).
  4. Brush, polish and check for any flecks of dust. If possible get an aerosol air-duster – it will really help. This cleaning process was necessary to capture the finer details of the lug/bracelet, and I managed to catch the screw-pin reflection in the square-cut end of the lug.
  5. Less is more – you don’t need to capture an infinite number of angles. As a watch photographer once revealed on a podcast, which rings true for me, you’ll only ever use a maximum of 20 shots, and with this watch I’d shot probably 72 frames, while ending up with nine to 10 good ones to run through Lightroom. Personally, I’m an honest hack keeping the edits to a minimum and preferring to spend more time dusting and lighting the shots than cheeky photoshop edits.